Archive for the ‘Eastern Europe’ Category

The Archives of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and their Relevance for Memory

BY IVA VUKUSIC Introduction In May 1993, as war was raging in the former Yugoslavia, the United Nations Security Council found itself grappling with an intractable conflict. While the U.N. response at the time was perhaps unconvincing, it ultimately resulted in a significant change to international criminal law; specifically, the establishment of the International Criminal […]

Share

Posted by on March 13th, 2013 Comments Off on The Archives of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and their Relevance for Memory

Introduction: Arts After Atrocity

BY JO-MARIE BURT In the aftermath of atrocity, societies develop diverse mechanisms to cope with the legacy of violence. The experienced trauma involves not only the physical violence visited upon individual bodies, but also the destruction of families, communities, and broader societal networks. Truth commissions seek to develop new narratives to understand past violence, while […]

Share

Posted by on March 13th, 2013 No Comments

Orange Revolution in Ukraine: Inspiration of Disillusionment?

BY KARINA V. KOROSTELINA The Orange Revolution in Ukraine was not just a series of protests and mass non-violent actions in the fall and winter of 2004-2005. It was an event that inspired people, especially young to believe in their own agency, their own ability to influence government and change the country for the best. […]

Share

Posted by on August 2nd, 2011 No Comments