Archive for the ‘Human Rights’ Category

The Archives of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and their Relevance for Memory

BY IVA VUKUSIC Introduction In May 1993, as war was raging in the former Yugoslavia, the United Nations Security Council found itself grappling with an intractable conflict. While the U.N. response at the time was perhaps unconvincing, it ultimately resulted in a significant change to international criminal law; specifically, the establishment of the International Criminal […]

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Posted by on March 13th, 2013 Comments Off on The Archives of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and their Relevance for Memory

Memories from the Margins: Art and Political Violence in Peru

BY KAREN BERNEDO Remembering is a process in constant motion, transformation, and negotiation. In that sense, memory is a way to mediate with the world, a filter through which we understand ourselves as being part of a community and a historical process. Although “memory” evokes a past that we cannot change, societies constantly re-define this […]

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Posted by on March 13th, 2013 No Comments

The Museum is in the Streets: The Itinerant Museum of Art for Memory

TTBY MAURICIO DELGADO After 20 years of internal armed conflict, dozens of massacres, torture, and hit squads; after the terror of the Shining Path, the “iron fist” of two “democratic” governments, and the Fujimori dictatorship; after hundreds of reports, opinion pieces and newspaper articles, a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), and an estimated 69,280 victims […]

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Posted by on March 13th, 2013 No Comments

Introduction: Arts After Atrocity

BY JO-MARIE BURT In the aftermath of atrocity, societies develop diverse mechanisms to cope with the legacy of violence. The experienced trauma involves not only the physical violence visited upon individual bodies, but also the destruction of families, communities, and broader societal networks. Truth commissions seek to develop new narratives to understand past violence, while […]

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Posted by on March 13th, 2013 No Comments

‘Don’t Disturb The Peace’: Post-Conflict Politics In Aceh, Indonesia

BY LESLIE DWYER When the tsunami came, tens of thousands of people were swallowed up in minutes by the waves. But here in this village, we were taken away two at a time, five at a time, ten at a time, for years. The families of those killed by the tsunami all have new houses, […]

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Posted by on August 30th, 2012 1 Comment

¿Primavera Hispana 2011?: Youth, Indignation, and Human Rights in the Hispanic World

BY RICARDO F. VIVANCOS PÉREZ In spring 2011, massive protests in Mexico and Spain placed youth center stage in the Hispanic world.1 In Mexico, non-violent demonstrations against drug-related violence, corruption, and impunity—organized by the Movimiento Paz con Justicia y Dignidad (MPJD)2—included a silent protest in Mexico City on May 8, and the Caravana del Consuelo or […]

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Posted by on August 2nd, 2011 No Comments

To Be or Not to Be: Croatian Human Rights Activists’ Struggle to Account for Mass Atrocities

BY ARNAUD KURZE Throughout the 1990s the state of Yugoslavia dissolved, ravaged by horrendous conflicts across the region. Since, several retributive and restorative mechanisms to cope with past atrocities have been attempted. Only a few years ago, a regional fact-finding project was launched by several established human rights organizations in the area. Currently, this so […]

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Posted by on March 28th, 2011 No Comments

Damned if They Do, Damned if They Don’t: Dilemmas of Internally Displaced Populations

BY CARLOS SLUZKI Internally displaced people (IDP), estimated at over 27 million individuals according to United Nations data (UNHCR 2010), are a byproduct of political violence or warfare not only in Sudan, Colombia, or Iraq (which are the three areas with the largest IDP population), but also in Yemen, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Somalia, Democratic […]

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Posted by on March 28th, 2011 No Comments

Democratizing the Production of Human Rights in Burma*

BY JOHN G. DALE The United Nations (UN) established the International Criminal Court (ICC) in 2002 to indict, try, and sentence individuals who commit any of four crimes, including war crimes or crimes against humanity. Although neither the United States nor Myanmar are currently signatories to the Rome Statute that created the authority and jurisdiction […]

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Posted by on October 10th, 2010 No Comments

The phenomenology of human rights at 35,000 feet …*

BY MARK GOODALE It is unsettling how an experience can rapidly shift from the incongruous to the profoundly moving, from a moment of surprise to the realization that one’s frame of reference, which has been put in place only with great difficulty, is no longer quite so adequate. So there I was, halfway through a […]

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Posted by on June 1st, 2010 No Comments