Archive for the ‘Justice’ Category

The Archives of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and their Relevance for Memory

BY IVA VUKUSIC Introduction In May 1993, as war was raging in the former Yugoslavia, the United Nations Security Council found itself grappling with an intractable conflict. While the U.N. response at the time was perhaps unconvincing, it ultimately resulted in a significant change to international criminal law; specifically, the establishment of the International Criminal […]

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Posted by on March 13th, 2013 Comments Off on The Archives of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and their Relevance for Memory

Memories from the Margins: Art and Political Violence in Peru

BY KAREN BERNEDO Remembering is a process in constant motion, transformation, and negotiation. In that sense, memory is a way to mediate with the world, a filter through which we understand ourselves as being part of a community and a historical process. Although “memory” evokes a past that we cannot change, societies constantly re-define this […]

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Posted by on March 13th, 2013 No Comments

“Radical Forgiveness”

BY SONYA RENEE   Introduction to “Radical Forgiveness” In 2008, I had the pleasure of living with filmmaker and producer Diana Romero in Los Angeles. Diana’s debut film Niña Quebrada was a compelling tale of a young woman’s experience with sex trafficking, which won numerous awards. Living with Diana meant that I was often able […]

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Posted by on March 13th, 2013 No Comments

The Museum is in the Streets: The Itinerant Museum of Art for Memory

TTBY MAURICIO DELGADO After 20 years of internal armed conflict, dozens of massacres, torture, and hit squads; after the terror of the Shining Path, the “iron fist” of two “democratic” governments, and the Fujimori dictatorship; after hundreds of reports, opinion pieces and newspaper articles, a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), and an estimated 69,280 victims […]

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Posted by on March 13th, 2013 No Comments

Introduction: Arts After Atrocity

BY JO-MARIE BURT In the aftermath of atrocity, societies develop diverse mechanisms to cope with the legacy of violence. The experienced trauma involves not only the physical violence visited upon individual bodies, but also the destruction of families, communities, and broader societal networks. Truth commissions seek to develop new narratives to understand past violence, while […]

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Posted by on March 13th, 2013 No Comments

Still Waiting

BY JO-MARIE BURT 1 On a warm spring afternoon in Lima this past November, several people stood vigil outside the National Criminal Court in the hours before the verdict in the Parcco-Pomatambo case was to be handed down.1 At the center of the vigil was an old-fashioned scale, adorned in pink roses, with candles lit […]

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Posted by on March 28th, 2011 No Comments

Introduction: Accountability in the Aftermath of Mass Atrocity

BY JO-MARIE BURT In spring 2008, the Transitional/Transnational Justice Working Group, a group of Mason faculty and graduate students interested in issues of global justice and human rights, launched the Human Rights, Global Justice and Democracy Project. The project’s central concern is to examine how societies that experienced mass atrocity cope with the legacies of […]

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Posted by on January 24th, 2010 No Comments

Accountability in Africa: Current Practice, Future Directions

BY MARK DRUMBL Several African atrocities have become judicialized internationally.  Cases include Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Uganda. An ad hoc tribunal created by the United Nations Security Council, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), prosecutes individuals suspected of high-level involvement in the 1994 Rwandan genocide.  A hybrid (mixed) […]

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Posted by on December 15th, 2009 No Comments

The Role of Criminal Prosecutions in Response to Grave Human Rights Violations at the Local, National and International Levels: the Case of Uganda

BY STEPHEN A. LAMONY Over the past two decades, Uganda has witnessed an increasing number of fundamental discussions on accountability for mass human rights atrocities at the local and national level. Interestingly, however, there has never been any local form of criminal prosecutions for grave human rights violations. To explain this reality, one has to […]

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Posted by on December 15th, 2009 1 Comment

The Layers of Amnesty: Evidence from Surveys of Victims in Five African Countries

DAVID BACKER INTRODUCTION The last 65 years have exhibited competing currents and ongoing debate with regards to accountability for human rights violations.1 After World War II, the Nuremberg and Tokyo war crimes tribunals convened by the Allied powers, as well as parallel legal processes in a number of countries, established key precedents for the prosecution […]

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Posted by on December 15th, 2009 No Comments