Archive for the ‘Middle East’ Category

Challenges In Conflict Data Collection: Assessing The Spatial Characteristics Of Nutritional Status In Erbil, Kurdistan, Iraq

BY HAMDIA AHMAD, TABAN K. RASHEED, LISA R. PAWLOSKI, AND KEVIN M. CURTIN It has been well-documented that significant difficulties arise when conducting field research in conflict areas.1 This article documents the process of collecting nutritional, anthropometric, and spatial data in a conflict region. Specifically, data were collected from more than 1,000 participants in the […]

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Posted by on August 30th, 2012 1 Comment

2011: The Arab World’s 1989 or 1848?

BY MARK N. KATZ Largely quiescent for decades, the Arab world has experienced a surprising—and surprisingly powerful—wave of revolutionary activity beginning in January 2011 and continuing ever since then.  So far, the “Arab Spring,” as it is popularly known, has resulted in the downfall of Tunisia’s Zene el-Abidine Ben Ali and Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak.  Although […]

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Posted by on August 2nd, 2011 No Comments

Origins and Reponses to the Arab Awakening

BY AZIZ ABU SARAH The series of Arab protests that started in Tunisia caught governments around the world by surprise. Western powers were confident that Arab leaders would quickly restore calm, and Arab leaders trusted they would be able to crush the protests. Western leaders in particular were so sure of the status quo that […]

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Posted by on August 2nd, 2011 No Comments

The Arab Uprisings: Caution Against Missed Elements

BY BASSAM HADDAD I would like to start by positing two remarks about the recent events in the region. I use the word events deliberately to underscore the multitude of problematic and misleading ways in which the protests have been characterized, interpreted, connected, and written off by observers. Are these revolutions, or as Asef Bayat […]

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Posted by on August 2nd, 2011 No Comments

India-Gulf Migration: Corruption and Capacity in Regulating Recruitment Agencies*

BY MARY E. BREEDING The recruitment of workers in India for the purpose of fulfilling construction and other low-skilled occupations in the Persian Gulf region has gained substantial attention in recent years.  Thousands of Indians emigrate to Gulf countries annually as contracted workers. In 2007 the number low-skilled Indian migrants acquiring emigration clearance to work […]

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Posted by on October 10th, 2010 1 Comment

Contesting Stereotypes: Muslim Women’s Responses to Globalized Fear Discourses

BY DORTHE POSSING A report, “Being a Muslim woman in Denmark,” published in March 2009 and commissioned by the former Danish Minister for Gender Equality, Karen Jespersen, concluded that the circulation of “Islamist” discourses on the Internet and Arabic satellite-TV put young Danish Muslim women’s notions of equality and citizenship at risk. The logic was […]

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Posted by on March 13th, 2010 No Comments

Atrocity in Context

BY SOLON SIMMONS There is no part of the world more crucial to the strategic interests of the United States as is the Middle East. While the traditional problems of the regulation of international affairs are at play there, Arab language satellite channels have created a new force in the region, and Al Jazeera is […]

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Posted by on July 6th, 2009 No Comments

Sharks and Dinosaurs: State-Business Relations in Syria

BY BASSAM HADDAD The state’s relationship with business communities can provide both detrimental and beneficial economic outcomes. One factor that impinges on successful development can be the state-business nexus. Is such underdevelopment a function of certain cultures? A study of how state and business actors come together in informal economic networks and shape patterns of […]

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Posted by on June 26th, 2007 No Comments

The Branch Campus: Globalization and US Universities in the Gulf

BY RANDA KAYYALI  Supply and demand has fuelled the circuits of production at the global level for many years now. Like other products, the offerings from higher education institutions have changed over the years. From the 1960s on, student exchanges were the dominant form of international education, but there are newer forms of global outreach […]

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Posted by on June 26th, 2007 No Comments

Public Policy and the Problem of Torture

BY JAMES P. PFIFFNER President George W. Bush proclaimed the official position of the United States on torture on June 26, 2003, the United Nations International Day in Support of Victims of Torture. “Freedom from torture is an inalienable human right,” he said. “The United States is committed to the worldwide elimination of torture, and […]

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Posted by on November 4th, 2005 No Comments