Archive for the ‘Peace and Conflict’ Category

Challenges In Conflict Data Collection: Assessing The Spatial Characteristics Of Nutritional Status In Erbil, Kurdistan, Iraq

BY HAMDIA AHMAD, TABAN K. RASHEED, LISA R. PAWLOSKI, AND KEVIN M. CURTIN It has been well-documented that significant difficulties arise when conducting field research in conflict areas.1 This article documents the process of collecting nutritional, anthropometric, and spatial data in a conflict region. Specifically, data were collected from more than 1,000 participants in the […]

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Posted by on August 30th, 2012 1 Comment

‘Don’t Disturb The Peace’: Post-Conflict Politics In Aceh, Indonesia

BY LESLIE DWYER When the tsunami came, tens of thousands of people were swallowed up in minutes by the waves. But here in this village, we were taken away two at a time, five at a time, ten at a time, for years. The families of those killed by the tsunami all have new houses, […]

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Posted by on August 30th, 2012 1 Comment

Emerging Donors and Post-Conflict Reconstruction

BY AGNIESZKA PACZYNSKA 1 The last two decades have witnessed fundamental shifts in international economic dynamics and the gradual reshaping of global political relationships and collaborations. In particular, emerging powers in the global south are now playing a much more prominent role in the global economy and are beginning to rewrite transnational political frameworks.  As their […]

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Posted by on October 12th, 2011 No Comments

Damned if They Do, Damned if They Don’t: Dilemmas of Internally Displaced Populations

BY CARLOS SLUZKI Internally displaced people (IDP), estimated at over 27 million individuals according to United Nations data (UNHCR 2010), are a byproduct of political violence or warfare not only in Sudan, Colombia, or Iraq (which are the three areas with the largest IDP population), but also in Yemen, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Somalia, Democratic […]

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Posted by on March 28th, 2011 No Comments

The phenomenology of human rights at 35,000 feet …*

BY MARK GOODALE It is unsettling how an experience can rapidly shift from the incongruous to the profoundly moving, from a moment of surprise to the realization that one’s frame of reference, which has been put in place only with great difficulty, is no longer quite so adequate. So there I was, halfway through a […]

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Posted by on June 1st, 2010 No Comments

Introduction: Accountability in the Aftermath of Mass Atrocity

BY JO-MARIE BURT In spring 2008, the Transitional/Transnational Justice Working Group, a group of Mason faculty and graduate students interested in issues of global justice and human rights, launched the Human Rights, Global Justice and Democracy Project. The project’s central concern is to examine how societies that experienced mass atrocity cope with the legacies of […]

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Posted by on January 24th, 2010 No Comments

Are We There Yet: Ideas For Evaluating the Progress of Transitional Justice

BY SUSAN BENESCH Once unimaginable, prosecutions for state-sponsored atrocities are multiplying rapidly.  They continue to deliver new milestones, both by expanding transnationally and by reaching previously untouchable defendants. Some trials astonish even their own proponents, as this symposium illustrated: Peru’s conviction of its former head of state Alberto Fujimori in April left Ronald Gamarra Herrera […]

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Posted by on December 15th, 2009 No Comments

The Role of Criminal Prosecutions in Response to Grave Human Rights Violations at the Local, National and International Levels: the Case of Uganda

BY STEPHEN A. LAMONY Over the past two decades, Uganda has witnessed an increasing number of fundamental discussions on accountability for mass human rights atrocities at the local and national level. Interestingly, however, there has never been any local form of criminal prosecutions for grave human rights violations. To explain this reality, one has to […]

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Posted by on December 15th, 2009 1 Comment

Reversing Accountability in South Africa: From Amnesty to Pardons and Non-Prosecutions

BY HUGO VAN DER MERWE In 1995, the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) introduced a mechanism that offered a morally compromised form of accountability: amnesty in exchange for public disclosure of truth.  While this was a bitter pill to swallow for the South African public and an unacceptable deal for many victims, it […]

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Posted by on December 15th, 2009 No Comments

Atrocity in Context

BY SOLON SIMMONS There is no part of the world more crucial to the strategic interests of the United States as is the Middle East. While the traditional problems of the regulation of international affairs are at play there, Arab language satellite channels have created a new force in the region, and Al Jazeera is […]

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Posted by on July 6th, 2009 No Comments