Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

Challenges In Conflict Data Collection: Assessing The Spatial Characteristics Of Nutritional Status In Erbil, Kurdistan, Iraq

BY HAMDIA AHMAD, TABAN K. RASHEED, LISA R. PAWLOSKI, AND KEVIN M. CURTIN It has been well-documented that significant difficulties arise when conducting field research in conflict areas.1 This article documents the process of collecting nutritional, anthropometric, and spatial data in a conflict region. Specifically, data were collected from more than 1,000 participants in the […]

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Posted by on August 30th, 2012 1 Comment

The Global Chase for Innovation: Is STEM Education the Catalyst?

BY CONNIE L. MCNEELY AND JONG-ON HAHM As science and technology-based innovations have driven economic success, countries around the world have sought ways to fuel innovation and increase the conditions and factors that promote its growth.  In the accompanying literature, innovation refers not merely to initial creativity, invention, or knowledge diffusion, but rather to the […]

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Posted by on April 25th, 2012 No Comments

International Collaboration by and for Women in Science and Technology

BY LISA M. FREHILL AND CONNIE L. MCNEELY Scientific collaboration is a key feature of the world’s innovation-driven knowledge economy. Indeed, collaboration is fundamental to how knowledge is created, diffused, and applied within and across countries today. The innovation process itself is not merely marked by collaboration at different levels of analysis, but is virtually […]

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Posted by on April 25th, 2012 No Comments

The Pandora’s Box of Biology

BY SONIA BEN OUAGHRAM-GORMLEY  On December 20, 2011, the press announced that the US government had requested two scientific journals – Science and Nature – to refrain from publishing a full account of an experiment that increased the transmissibility of bird flu virus H5N1.1 Government concerns that bioterrorists might use published data on the experimental details […]

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Posted by on April 25th, 2012 No Comments

Economic Planning in Socialism and Capitalism

BY JOHANNA BOCKMAN In 1975, Soviet economist Leonid Kantorovich and American economist Tjalling Koopmans jointly won the Nobel Prize in Economics “for their contributions to the theory of optimum allocation of resources.”1 How could an economist of socialism and an economist of capitalism share this prestigious prize? Michael Bernstein, historian of the United States and Provost […]

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Posted by on June 1st, 2010 No Comments

Globalization & Public Health Research

BY KATHRYN H. JACOBSEN In 2003 several individuals who ate at a chain restaurant near Pittsburgh died from hepatitis A virus. The outbreak was eventually linked to green onions imported from Mexico. Oddly enough, people who live in the United States are in some ways at greater risk of death from hepatitis A than populations […]

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Posted by on November 21st, 2007 No Comments

Globalization of Research: Implications for U.S. Science

BY WILLIAM A. BLANPIED Modern science provides what may be the first robust example of a globalized activity. The contributions of a Pole (Copernicus), a German (Kepler), and an Italian (Galileo) to what became known as the Newtonian synthesis is probably the most obvious case in point. Four centuries later, scientific research remains a highly […]

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Posted by on March 11th, 2005 No Comments